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Corticon Studio: Rule Modeling Guide : Rule writing techniques and logical equivalents : Qualifying rules with ranges and lists : Using ranges and value sets in condition cells : Using value lists in condition cells
 

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Using value lists in condition cells
Most Conditions implemented in the Rules section of the Rulesheet use a single value in a Cell, as shown in the following figure: 
Figure 82. Rulesheet with One Value Selected in Condition Cell
Sometimes, however, it is useful to combine more than one value in the same Cell. This is accomplished by holding CTRL while clicking to select multiple values from the Condition Cell drop-down box. When multiple values are selected in this manner, pressing ENTER will automatically enclose the resulting set in curly brackets {..} in the Cell as shown in the sequence of Rulesheet with Two Values Selected in Condition Cell and Rulesheet with Value Set in Condition Cell. Additional values may also be typed into Cells. Be sure the comma separators and curly brackets remain correct during hand-editing.
Figure 83. Rulesheet with Two Values Selected in Condition Cell
Figure 84. Rulesheet with Value Set in Condition Cell
The rule implemented in Column 1 of Rulesheet with Value Set in Condition Cell is logically equivalent to the Rulesheet shown in Rulesheet with Two Rules in Lieu of Value Set. Both are implementations of the following rule statement:
Figure 85. Rulesheet with Two Rules in Lieu of Value Set
If you write rules that are logically OR'ed in separate Columns, performing a Compression will reduce the Rulesheet to the fewest number of Columns possible by creating value sets in Cells wherever possible. Fewer Columns results in faster Rulesheet execution, even when those Columns contain value sets. Compressing the Rulesheet in Rulesheet with Two Rules in Lieu of Value Set will result in the Rulesheet in Rulesheet with Value Set in Condition Cell.
Condition Cell value sets can also be negated using the not operator. To negate a value, simply type not in front of the leading curly bracket { as shown in Negating a Value Set in a Condition Cell. This is an implementation of the following rule statement:
which, given the Condition Cell's value set, is equivalent to:
Figure 86. Negating a Value Set in a Condition Cell
Value sets can also be created in the Overrides Cells at the foot of each Column. This allows one rule to override multiple rules in the same Rulesheet.